Player Watch Player Watch: Harry Kane

1966

Neutral England supporter
Joined
Nov 5, 2019
Messages
79
Hello, friends. I'm new here. I'm not a supporter of any club; I only support the England national team (which is exactly as dismal as it sounds -- though less so recently). But Kane is my favourite player so I've come to camp out in your wonderful thread and spread love for Kane.

I do the same thing on RedCafe to a more hostile audience
 

Thewobbler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2016
Messages
1,630
Hello, friends. I'm new here. I'm not a supporter of any club; I only support the England national team (which is exactly as dismal as it sounds -- though less so recently). But Kane is my favourite player so I've come to camp out in your wonderful thread and spread love for Kane.

I do the same thing on RedCafe to a more hostile audience
Why have you chosen not to support a club?
 

cliff jones

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
2,377
Hello, friends. I'm new here. I'm not a supporter of any club; I only support the England national team (which is exactly as dismal as it sounds -- though less so recently). But Kane is my favourite player so I've come to camp out in your wonderful thread and spread love for Kane.

I do the same thing on RedCafe to a more hostile audience
Got any updates on his fitness?
Cheers
 
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
20,902
Hello, friends. I'm new here. I'm not a supporter of any club; I only support the England national team (which is exactly as dismal as it sounds -- though less so recently). But Kane is my favourite player so I've come to camp out in your wonderful thread and spread love for Kane.

I do the same thing on RedCafe to a more hostile audience
Hi Harry!
 

JimmyG2

SC Supporter
Joined
Dec 7, 2006
Messages
9,537
Hello, friends. I'm new here. I'm not a supporter of any club; I only support the England national team (which is exactly as dismal as it sounds -- though less so recently). But Kane is my favourite player so I've come to camp out in your wonderful thread and spread love for Kane.

I do the same thing on RedCafe to a more hostile audience
1966. Hmm think that might be a clue.
Welcome.
In a month you'll either
be on an Arsenal forum
or seeking season tickets at NWHL.
Don't worry we're all very nice here,
well mostly,
well some,
Well there's me.
 

1966

Neutral England supporter
Joined
Nov 5, 2019
Messages
79
1966. Hmm think that might be a clue.
Welcome.
In a month you'll either
be on an Arsenal forum
or seeking season tickets at NWHL.
Don't worry we're all very nice here,
well mostly,
well some,
Well there's me.
Why have you chosen not to support a club?
That's a hard one because I'm in an environment here full of people who do support a club so all of your positions are sort of naturally opposite mine. I'll try to give an honest but respectful answer.

I love football, especially playing it but watching too. I've always supported England because, well, I'm English! But I just can't bring myself to support a corporation. No matter how much we as football fans try to trick ourselves, modern clubs are no different to any other business.

For me, loyalty to a club makes almost the same amount of sense as loyalty to Pepsi over Coke. I say "almost" because I accept that it's a very crude analogy: there are countless variables involved in a football club that might compel you to choose one over another -- they're not quite as fungible as fizzy drinks!

It feels like the relationship between a supporter and their club is so one-sided, particularly as you get more invested. A fan might feel like shit all week because of a result - which I personally think is a really unhealthy way to engage with any sport and there's a good thread on here about that - but it happens. Even players very rarely have loyalty to their clubs nowadays and probably don't feel as bad as their supporters after a crap result, and they certainly don't feel bad because of their supporters, which is a terrible power dynamic.

There was a time when supporting your local football club made complete sense because it was your local football club. Supporting your local club was a microcosm of supporting your country. The players themselves were local and loyal, money wasn't the all-powerful motivator it is now and what little of it entered the system effectively entered the local economy. Of course, the game hasn't been so pure within living memory for most of us, but it's sad just how incredibly far we've drifted from anything resembling that traditional game.

The problems in the game that have appeared since those days only ever seem to get more extreme. Fans get shafted for maximum profit, pushing a large segment of society out of the game in the process (sadly, ticket prices at Spurs are relevant here). Players get ever more outrageously overpaid while everyone in the real world has seen their real wage purchasing power shrink for decades. The league title goes up for sale every summer in the transfer market. The media and now particularly "social" media surrounding football is a cesspit. None of the owners, managers, coaches or players are actually from the areas they nominally represent.

The latter is especially important because it means that the tribal identity and sense of belonging for which people use football clubs as a surrogate are contrived and unnatural. For some people, football becomes a deeply unhealthy form of escapism, particularly when club allegiance is the dominant component of their identity and football news subsumes regular news. Bread and circuses, indeed. I love that quote - can't remember the exact words or who said it - that goes something like "football is the most important of the least important things in life". That about sums up its correct role in society for me.

Obviously it follows that I have no problem with everyday club supporters, though I'm sometimes alarmed by people whose entire lives and mood states depend on football matches. I try to help them out and provide gentle but useful advice. I'm a neuroscientist with an interest in the phenomenon of football supportership. :)

Anyway, I love the beautiful game and I love being able to take in a match each weekend without feeling any concern or pressure. I know what it's like with the emotional pressure because I feel the same during any international tournament. Sometimes football is more fun as a neutral and I think we as supporters sometimes forget how to just appreciate great skill, entertainment and matches, regardless of who's responsible. I'm guilty of doing that when England plays another top nation: disregarding beautiful football when it comes from the opposition.

I've been following Kane's career almost from the beginning. I was well into him when he was a promising young England striker playing for the U21s. I'm always a little bit proud to boast that I saw potential in him long before most people and never believed for a second that he'd be a one-season wonder (I admittedly didn't see him becoming this good!).

As his career unfolded - more like exploded, really - I had to watch every Spurs game to see him play. I've seen almost every game he's ever played in: haven't missed an England match for over ten years and only missed a handful of Spurs games since the start of '14/15.

Through a sort of osmosis, I've developed the knowledge of Spurs that a devoted Spurs supporter would have and ended up with a soft spot for the club. If I had to support a club, it would absolutely be Spurs. Consider me a particularly sympathetic neutral. Although I do miss the seasons where Spurs were absolutely immense while having half the England XI in theirs.

Thanks for the welcome, friends. All the likes and what have you. I've been a lurker here and at TFC for years. It took me that long to decide which forum was the better and friendlier venue. You lads won in the end.

@JimmyG2 Yeah, you seem like a good bunch. Sadly, I won't be getting a season ticket at NWHL (especially not at those prices!) as much as I'd love to see Kane play live again. On the flip side, you couldn't send me running for the Gooners if you tried. They have no English players and their fans, in my experience, are terrible people, second only to Liverpool fans on the axis of evil.

@Gassin's finest Oi, m8. You saying Kane ain't good enough to have superfans? ;)
 

Legacy

SC Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Messages
2,498
@JimmyG2 Yeah, you seem like a good bunch. Sadly, I won't be getting a season ticket at NWHL (especially not at those prices!) as much as I'd love to see Kane play live again. On the flip side, you couldn't send me running for the Gooners if you tried. They have no English players and their fans, in my experience, are terrible people, second only to Liverpool fans on the axis of evil.

@Gassin's finest Oi, m8. You saying Kane ain't good enough to have superfans like me? ;)
I like you already.
 
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
20,902
That's a hard one because I'm in an environment here full of people who do support a club so all of your positions are sort of naturally opposite mine. I'll try to give an honest but respectful answer.

I love football, especially playing it but watching too. I've always supported England because, well, I'm English! But I just can't bring myself to support a corporation. No matter how much we as football fans try to trick ourselves, modern clubs are no different to any other business.

For me, loyalty to a club makes almost the same amount of sense as loyalty to Pepsi over Coke. I say "almost" because I accept that it's a very crude analogy: there are countless variables involved in a football club that might compel you to choose one over another -- they're not quite as fungible as fizzy drinks!

It feels like the relationship between a supporter and their club is so one-sided, particularly as you get more invested. A fan might feel like shit all week because of a result - which I personally think is a really unhealthy way to engage with any sport and there's a good thread on here about that - but it happens. Even players very rarely have loyalty to their clubs nowadays and probably don't feel as bad as their supporters after a crap result, and they certainly don't feel bad because of their supporters, which is a terrible power dynamic.

There was a time when supporting your local football club made complete sense because it was your local football club. Supporting your local club was a microcosm of supporting your country. The players themselves were local and loyal, money wasn't the all-powerful motivator it is now and what little of it entered the system effectively entered the local economy. Of course, the game hasn't been so pure within living memory for most of us, but it's sad just how incredibly far we've drifted from anything resembling that traditional game.

The problems in the game that have appeared since those days only ever seem to get more extreme. Fans get shafted for maximum profit, pushing a large segment of society out of the game in the process (sadly, ticket prices at Spurs are relevant here). Players get ever more outrageously overpaid while everyone in the real world has seen their real wage purchasing power shrink for decades. The league title goes up for sale every summer in the transfer market. The media and now particularly "social" media surrounding football is a cesspit. None of the owners, managers, coaches or players are actually from the areas they nominally represent.

The latter is especially important because it means that the tribal identity and sense of belonging for which people use football clubs as a surrogate are contrived and unnatural. For some people, football becomes a deeply unhealthy form of escapism, particularly when club allegiance is the dominant component of their identity and football news subsumes regular news. Bread and circuses, indeed. I love that quote - can't remember the exact words or who said it - that goes something like "football is the most important of the least important things in life". That about sums up its correct role in society for me.

Obviously it follows that I have no problem with everyday club supporters, though I'm sometimes alarmed by people whose entire lives and mood states depend on football matches. I try to help them out and provide gentle but useful advice. I'm a neuroscientist with an interest in the phenomenon of football supportership. :)

Anyway, I love the beautiful game and I love being able to take in a match each weekend without feeling any concern or pressure. I know what it's like with the emotional pressure because I feel the same during any international tournament. Sometimes football is more fun as a neutral and I think we as supporters sometimes forget how to just appreciate great skill, entertainment and matches, regardless of who's responsible. I'm guilty of doing that when England plays another top nation: disregarding beautiful football when it comes from the opposition.

I've been following Kane's career almost from the beginning. I was well into him when he was a promising young England striker playing for the U21s. I'm always a little bit proud to boast that I saw potential in him long before most people and never believed for a second that he'd be a one-season wonder (I admittedly didn't see him becoming this good!).

As his career unfolded - more like exploded, really - I had to watch every Spurs game to see him play. I've seen almost every game he's ever played in: haven't missed an England match for over ten years and only missed a handful of Spurs games since the start of '14/15.

Through a sort of osmosis, I've developed the knowledge of Spurs that a devoted Spurs supporter would have and ended up with a soft spot for the club. If I had to support a club, it would absolutely be Spurs. Consider me a particularly sympathetic neutral. Although I do miss the seasons where Spurs were absolutely immense while having half the England XI in theirs.

Thanks for the welcome, friends. All the likes and what have you. I've been a lurker here and at TFC for years. It took me that long to decide which forum was the better and friendlier venue. You lads won in the end.

@JimmyG2 Yeah, you seem like a good bunch. Sadly, I won't be getting a season ticket at NWHL (especially not at those prices!) as much as I'd love to see Kane play live again. On the flip side, you couldn't send me running for the Gooners if you tried. They have no English players and their fans, in my experience, are terrible people, second only to Liverpool fans on the axis of evil.

@Gassin's finest Oi, m8. You saying Kane ain't good enough to have superfans? ;)
Support your local lower league club?
 

Hakkz

Svensk hetsporre
Joined
Jul 6, 2012
Messages
5,627
On the flip side, you couldn't send me running for the Gooners if you tried. They have no English players and their fans, in my experience, are terrible people, second only to Liverpool fans on the axis of evil.
Welcome!! (y)(y)
 

AnotherSpursFan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
992
Poch is unsure if Kanes will be fit for the UCL game.

This is a confirmation that Moura will have one minute of running around on matchday.
 
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