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Player Watch Player Watch: Manor Solomon

Yid-ol

Just-outside Edinburgh
Jan 16, 2006
31,738
20,142
Wouldn't it be taking legal action of FIFA? As they deemed the players could leave, and from memory they have already tried and failed in a court Vs FIFA.
 

Meercat

Well-Known Member
Jul 4, 2008
1,148
6,421
Can’t we just send him back and reclaim the wasted wages as he must have been theirs, and say have it if, Shaktar… ;)
 

SirHarryHotspur

Well-Known Member
Aug 9, 2017
5,606
8,512
Why are the Telegraph rehashing this story from last year , prospect of a massive Labour majority must be putting the wind up them.
The contract ruling on players in Ukraine and Russia is down to FIFA, he was a free agent.
 

$hoguN

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2005
26,832
35,349
Will be interesting to see what we do with Manor. He is going to be a 3rd choice out of the wing when we the likes of Mikey Moore who we may prefer to give minutes too
 
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taidgh

Well-Known Member
Aug 13, 2004
8,302
17,136
Will be interesting to see what we do with Manor. He is going to be a 3rd choice out of the wing when we the likes of Micky Moore who we may prefer to give minutes too
1718261004747.png
 

olithfc

Oli
Nov 30, 2007
530
767
Wonder if he's in some kind of breach of contract with this war shit he's posting. Not the publicity the club needs.
Players like Saliba posted about rafah with no consequences (despite not being Israeli or Palestinian)? No one raising the issue of breach of contract in that case.

either there is a blanket ban on footballers and politics (hard to enforce when football itself gets involved such as Ukraine) or Solomon can post what he likes and Saliba can post what he likes and they both might be best advised not to do so
 

Locotoro

Prince of Zamunda
Sep 2, 2004
9,711
14,963
My preference would be for footballers to not post politically related messages one way or another. They may be posting on their own accounts but actually they are representatives of the club and have a platform because of their profession.

At the same time, clubs would do well do adequately train and educate their players rather than just expect a young 20 something year old to understand the consequences of their actions.

The problem is that we have fallen in the trap of allowing politics into our sport and that will now never stop because now we'll see it used as gain for those in charge.
 

Mellow Man Ace

Active Member
Feb 23, 2013
15
106
My preference would be for footballers to not post politically related messages one way or another. They may be posting on their own accounts but actually they are representatives of the club and have a platform because of their profession.

At the same time, clubs would do well do adequately train and educate their players rather than just expect a young 20 something year old to understand the consequences of their actions.

The problem is that we have fallen in the trap of allowing politics into our sport and that will now never stop because now we'll see it used as gain for those in charge.

I strongly disagree. What you call "politics" others call human rights. Indeed, as a black person, Ive lost count of how many times people have called anti-racism "political" as opposed to it being very much a human rights issue for me.

I have no issue with players making political statements, what I am against is any player putting out statements that contradict our clubs values of equality, respect and fairness. As long as those are respected then I think we should be able to live and let live
 

alfie103

Well-Known Member
Jun 4, 2005
4,117
4,629
Blimey, is this just rehashing an old story or does the chairman keep bringing this up every few months?
What he hoping to gain from it?

To be fair, if the shoe was on the other foot, a lot of people on here would be extremely pissed off. I think we did take advantage of the situation personally.

You know Levy would be fuming if it happened to us.
 

Locotoro

Prince of Zamunda
Sep 2, 2004
9,711
14,963
I strongly disagree. What you call "politics" others call human rights. Indeed, as a black person, Ive lost count of how many times people have called anti-racism "political" as opposed to it being very much a human rights issue for me.

I have no issue with players making political statements, what I am against is any player putting out statements that contradict our clubs values of equality, respect and fairness. As long as those are respected then I think we should be able to live and let live
I call it politics because unfortunately we live in a world where "human rights" is not an objective term. As a Muslim of north African origin I've had my fair share of racism and demonisation from different groups so I empathise with your point. Having said that, the moment someone comes out in support of one group they are inherently appearing to be against another and when the club declares it has values and principles that they want to have adhered to we give room for clubs to perpetuate values that are not inclusive and that can be used "politically".

An example is the Ukraine support that UEFA and FIFA went to great lengths to televise and advertise. Why was this? Is it because that conflict is somehow different to all the other conflicts that continue around the world? Is it because Ukrainians are more important than Uighurs, Israelis or Palestinians or any other nation involved in a war. Or is it because there was a concerted political decision made to "punish" Russia for their actions both economically and morally by excluding them from sporting competitions.

Another example is the world cup in Qatar. The western media went full throttle criticising Qatar and their government for what is perceived as poor human rights records, migrant worker rights, LGBTQ rights, preventing the sale of alcohol. These arguments may have been well meant but many were laced with hypocrisy. Banning the sale of alcohol in football events became a big thing but no stopped to state that Spain and France and in Scotland alcohol is banned at football events. That in Russia and South Africa who hosted the world cup four years earlier they also have laws that were anti-lgbtq. The team that won the World cup, Argentina, currently has a government that is openly anti LGBTQ - and yet none of this was mentioned at the time. Is it because these are all "footballing" nations and Qatar isn't whatever that means?

For simplicity, I don't trust a club, an association or a confederation to determine what societal values are "right" and which ones are "wrong" because most of the time they end up becoming populist, self preservational or worst still, just aligned with whatever makes the most money.

Society values shouldn't be marketed to us or used as virtue signalling in the way companies and corporations do today least of all in Sport.

I respect your view and I agree with the sentiment but I disagree with the mechanism to which it should be achieved.
 

Mellow Man Ace

Active Member
Feb 23, 2013
15
106
I call it politics because unfortunately we live in a world where "human rights" is not an objective term. As a Muslim of north African origin I've had my fair share of racism and demonisation from different groups so I empathise with your point. Having said that, the moment someone comes out in support of one group they are inherently appearing to be against another and when the club declares it has values and principles that they want to have adhered to we give room for clubs to perpetuate values that are not inclusive and that can be used "politically".

An example is the Ukraine support that UEFA and FIFA went to great lengths to televise and advertise. Why was this? Is it because that conflict is somehow different to all the other conflicts that continue around the world? Is it because Ukrainians are more important than Uighurs, Israelis or Palestinians or any other nation involved in a war. Or is it because there was a concerted political decision made to "punish" Russia for their actions both economically and morally by excluding them from sporting competitions.

Another example is the world cup in Qatar. The western media went full throttle criticising Qatar and their government for what is perceived as poor human rights records, migrant worker rights, LGBTQ rights, preventing the sale of alcohol. These arguments may have been well meant but many were laced with hypocrisy. Banning the sale of alcohol in football events became a big thing but no stopped to state that Spain and France and in Scotland alcohol is banned at football events. That in Russia and South Africa who hosted the world cup four years earlier they also have laws that were anti-lgbtq. The team that won the World cup, Argentina, currently has a government that is openly anti LGBTQ - and yet none of this was mentioned at the time. Is it because these are all "footballing" nations and Qatar isn't whatever that means?

For simplicity, I don't trust a club, an association or a confederation to determine what societal values are "right" and which ones are "wrong" because most of the time they end up becoming populist, self preservational or worst still, just aligned with whatever makes the most money.

Society values shouldn't be marketed to us or used as virtue signalling in the way companies and corporations do today least of all in Sport.

I respect your view and I agree with the sentiment but I disagree with the mechanism to which it should be achieved.
Excellent post. We basically are agreeing on the principle it seems but have a difference of view on how to achieve it. I of course, respect your viewpoint.

Always nice to be able to have a sensible debate about things like this.👍🏾
 

Romulus

Well-Known Member
Jun 14, 2012
7,476
12,003
Any info on his rehab?

Really looking forward to seeing this guy play again, offers something very different from the other wingers.

having said that, if he's still not ready come start of season its probably best to part ways
 

Monkey boy

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2011
6,542
17,446
I wonder if people’s perception of him would be different if we signed him at his true market value rather than on a dodgy free transfer.

I keep seeing things about letting him go yet if you back to the start of his thread people were generally quite excited about his arrival.

I haven’t seen anywhere near enough of him to make a judgement either way.
 

Hazelton

Unknown Member
Jul 11, 2011
6,289
22,148
I wonder if people’s perception of him would be different if we signed him at his true market value rather than on a dodgy free transfer.

I keep seeing things about letting him go yet if you back to the start of his thread people were generally quite excited about his arrival.

I haven’t seen anywhere near enough of him to make a judgement either way.
I also think that because of the free transfer, he's seen as easy profit if sold.
 

yido_number1

He'll always be magic
Jun 8, 2004
8,876
17,390
I wonder if people’s perception of him would be different if we signed him at his true market value rather than on a dodgy free transfer.

I keep seeing things about letting him go yet if you back to the start of his thread people were generally quite excited about his arrival.

I haven’t seen anywhere near enough of him to make a judgement either way.
I think it's mostly the fact that he's been injured for the majority of two years and with minimal updates from the club as to what's going on.

Sure Sessegnon being injured for his whole time at spurs has impacted it.
 
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