There or not there?

Who knows more?


  • Total voters
    44

Shadydan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2012
Messages
22,795
#41
It’s an interesting one. There are certainly bits you pick up on when watching live that you don’t get from the TV.

But sometimes TV can clarify something quickly that couldn’t be seen live.

One thing I am sure of is anyone claiming to know more about football because they go to games is a muppet.
@Mrs VDV
 

StanSpur

Ronny Rosenthal
Joined
Jul 15, 2004
Messages
2,076
#42
Difficult to say as I never watch a full game on TV after I've been to the stadium. What you don't get from TV is the shape of the team and the work rate off the ball as the camera focuses on the player in possession. The Chelsea cup game at Wembley for example. Chelsea were great in that game at closing down the space. The whole team moved like a swarm of bees in a very tight and controlled formation that we could not break down (we should have pumped more long balls over the top). What that type of thing results in on TV is Tottenham being ineffective and ponderous as they cannot find a way through. Equally in the stadium you miss the small details that show a player who looked average in the stands, actually having a great effect on the game by putting in little touches and tackles etc. Both are great ways of watching a game and both are awful experiences - really all depends on the result at the end of the day!
 

dontcallme

SC Supporter
Joined
Mar 18, 2005
Messages
14,702
#43
I find myself less analytical at games. Just go with the emotion more.

Live games are more memorable and a poor performance can live with me longer than a poor one on TV.
 

Flashspur

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2012
Messages
5,643
#44
I spent years watching games live regularly from a young lad to my 40’s. Since living abroad i’ve watched a lot on TV however my trips home mean I usually catch 2-3 games a season at WHL and Wembley. I’ve got to say you can’t beat the in game atmosphere but as far as observation goes, not being there is better. You just see more of the dynamics of the game on TV.
 

spids

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2015
Messages
1,185
#45
Even where you sit can influence your opinion on a game. Sitting high up behind a goal is different to sitting on the half way line, which in turn is different to sitting low down level with the penalty area. If I am watching a neutral game I generally like to be high behind a goal as you get a real appreciation for the way players make and close down space, the way defensive lines move across the pitch as one etc. Alternatively, watching Ginola close up from the shelf was an incredible experience and you really got a much better appreciation of his pace and power as well as his footwork, and then second half you got to see just how hard Stephen Carr worked up and down that flank (jeez - they were the only two bright spots some games in that era!). The benefit of sitting on the half way line is you see the whole pitch, including the players runs that are out of shot on the telly.I've only sat low behind the goals once and it was a totally different experience again (and I can see why some will much prefer this). You don't get to see what is going on in other areas of the pitch as well, but you really get to appreciate the physicality and speed and dynamism of football and are much closer to the players at th emopst emotive moments.

Ultimately everyone has different opinions, and two people with the same view can have totally different views on what they saw. You cannot beat being there (IMO), but if you watch a game on TV you do get the benefit of replays etc. but there is a danger of being positively or negatively influenced by the commentary and pundits. I've watched games where the co-commentator has been slagging a player off when I think he's actually playing really well. Foyth away at West Ham this season being a great example where surprisingly started and played really well the week after his mistakes away at Wolves. The commentator clearly had an anti-Foyth agenda from the first minute as all he know about Foyth was the penalties he'd conceded the week before and had probably never seen him play. And when he made a minor mistake early on that was his narrative for the next 90 mins. Foyth actually had a stormer (in my opinion) and yet some Spurs fans I discussed the game afterwards with were repeating what the commentator had said almost word for word and thought he'd played badly.
 

easley91

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
7,133
#46
Even where you sit can influence your opinion on a game. Sitting high up behind a goal is different to sitting on the half way line, which in turn is different to sitting low down level with the penalty area. If I am watching a neutral game I generally like to be high behind a goal as you get a real appreciation for the way players make and close down space, the way defensive lines move across the pitch as one etc. Alternatively, watching Ginola close up from the shelf was an incredible experience and you really got a much better appreciation of his pace and power as well as his footwork, and then second half you got to see just how hard Stephen Carr worked up and down that flank (jeez - they were the only two bright spots some games in that era!). The benefit of sitting on the half way line is you see the whole pitch, including the players runs that are out of shot on the telly.I've only sat low behind the goals once and it was a totally different experience again (and I can see why some will much prefer this). You don't get to see what is going on in other areas of the pitch as well, but you really get to appreciate the physicality and speed and dynamism of football and are much closer to the players at th emopst emotive moments.

Ultimately everyone has different opinions, and two people with the same view can have totally different views on what they saw. You cannot beat being there (IMO), but if you watch a game on TV you do get the benefit of replays etc. but there is a danger of being positively or negatively influenced by the commentary and pundits. I've watched games where the co-commentator has been slagging a player off when I think he's actually playing really well. Foyth away at West Ham this season being a great example where surprisingly started and played really well the week after his mistakes away at Wolves. The commentator clearly had an anti-Foyth agenda from the first minute as all he know about Foyth was the penalties he'd conceded the week before and had probably never seen him play. And when he made a minor mistake early on that was his narrative for the next 90 mins. Foyth actually had a stormer (in my opinion) and yet some Spurs fans I discussed the game afterwards with were repeating what the commentator had said almost word for word and thought he'd played badly.
I actually prefer to be high up when at the game if possible. I like to see the entire pitch. I remember going to an England v USA friendly at Wembley shortly after it opened, we were sat low in the corner by the away section. Couldn't see the other side of the pitch at all. Was horrible. Was low down vs Wolves about the halfway line, although got a good angle of Kane's goal, I couldn't really watch the game. What didn't help were two tall lads in front of me filming, so every time an attack was on for either team they kept angling themselves in my way.
 

riggi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
38,256
#47
Been going regularly for over 20 years until last October. Been watching every game on a screen since. You get your smartarse know it alls both in the pub and at the game, it’s all about opinions but at the end of the day you just can’t beat being there.
This.

Plenty of people take their agendas into the ground aswell as post them on here.
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2017
Messages
69
#48
I've never claimed to know more about football because I go to games, I just find your constant need to call people out over things they may have said in anger or frustration weeks/months/years previously quite pathetic when you sit at home and tell people they're shit fans/supporters.

You love it when we lose because you get to say "I love SC when we lose" like you're superior to the rest of us. People feel the frustration, anger and/or disappointment of Spurs not winning in different ways. For me, it ruins my weekend and I won't watch any other matches. For you, it doesn't really bother you (it seems).
 
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