"Sunderland ‘Til I Die" - netflix documentary

Spurger King

can't smile without glue
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#83
About halfway through this.

A very interesting mix of comedy, sadness, good guys and bad guys. Clearly shows how once things start to go wrong they can quickly snowball. As they said, they needed a striker but who would want to join them in that situation?
 

Spurger King

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#86
Finished watching this. Bain seemed alright. I thought Coleman came across as a genuinely nice guy. Maybe that’s part of the problem.

It was pretty fascinating.
 

Wheeler Dealer

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#88
Impossible job for all involved. Sunderland set up needed cash just to survive. Once this was removed their decline was rapid. They are the footballing version of Carrilion
 

C0YS

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#95
The problem was Coleman didn't quite grasp the seriousness of the situation when he came in. Plus he'd just come off the back of the Wales job, where he'd had a super-tight bunch of players who'd go through walls for him. He then comes across this little prick Grabben, who's obviously their best player, and acting like he's Johnny Big Bollocks, so he thinks he can get rid of him and get someone else.

It was obviously a massive, massive mistake, as was not bringing in a super-experienced keeper, who could steady the ship in defence. They needed to find a 35-year-old with loads of experience who wouldn't start shitting himself every time a goal went in.
To be fair they did bring in Camp, who is very experienced in the division and you'd assume a decent keeper. Pretty much exactly what you described.

Mind, Steele was a very decent championship keeper before going to Sunderland. I think Grayson's faffing and not informing the goalkeepers about who'd be playing until the last minute and constant changing just helped ruin the form of both Steele and Ruiter. Once the confidence has gone a keeper can really suffer.
 

NinjaTuna

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#96
To be fair they did bring in Camp, who is very experienced in the division and you'd assume a decent keeper. Pretty much exactly what you described.

Mind, Steele was a very decent championship keeper before going to Sunderland. I think Grayson's faffing and not informing the goalkeepers about who'd be playing until the last minute and constant changing just helped ruin the form of both Steele and Ruiter. Once the confidence has gone a keeper can really suffer.
Yeah, i think that Ruiter admitting he was shocked to find out he was playing, especially so soon before a game, says it all
 

SugarRay

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Jul 6, 2011
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5,998
#97
Impossible job for all involved. Sunderland set up needed cash just to survive. Once this was removed their decline was rapid. They are the footballing version of Carrilion
What, you mean a load of Tories and upper crusts earned lots of money from dodgy deals that subsequently left the little guys out of money and small businesses going under?
 

easley91

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#98
My takeaway from the documentary, was when clubs get relegated, you don't automatically think about the staff that work at the ground and training ground. The chefs, the groundsmen, receptionists, admin etc. You don't truly appreciate what could happen to them. And for Sunderland, they are the backbone and all came across likable to me. Don't know if it was just for the cameras, but Coleman going around shaking everyone's hands when he started was a nice touch. Also when he got sacked, leaving a message with the head chef and her team. Lovely stuff.
 

'O Zio

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#99
My takeaway from the documentary, was when clubs get relegated, you don't automatically think about the staff that work at the ground and training ground. The chefs, the groundsmen, receptionists, admin etc. You don't truly appreciate what could happen to them. And for Sunderland, they are the backbone and all came across likable to me. Don't know if it was just for the cameras, but Coleman going around shaking everyone's hands when he started was a nice touch. Also when he got sacked, leaving a message with the head chef and her team. Lovely stuff.
To be fair despite turning out to be a bit useless, I do think Coleman comes across quite well in it.

Regarding the forgotten behind the scenes staff, let's also not forget that during the Moyes era Sunderland laid off a load of it's staff just days after the first team squad and a huge entourage all spend 10 days "team building" in America which by the sounds of it involved very little to do with football and was more just a jolly in which they went to see an NBA game, went to the Red Hot Chili Peppers concert, no doubt staying in top of the range facilities the whole time. Absolute fucking disgrace.
 
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