spurs warm up and drills/coaching advice

fuzzylogic

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Thread starter #1
Does anyone here to to the games early enough to be able to catch some footage of the warm up and drills spurs do before the game. I've had a little look on YouTube and found a couple. What it is, I'm going back into football and I've been offered a coaching position at a club that I used to play with. I'm looking to get some new ideas whilst taking some ideas of my own to teach the kids. I've got a training session tomorrow with them and I've been told I'm more than welcome to take a few drills. I've got enough in my head from years of playing 20 odd years ago. Obviously I know they won't be able to do everything but looking to get maybe a bit that I could use at a later date. Also and advise from current coaches is more than welcome. Cheers guy
 

Nocando

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#4
They used to do an excellent drill where they pass between full back and winger then a midfield player sends one down the line and the winger crosses into the box and a group of attackers and defenders and they compete to score / defend. The ball is then fed back to the winger who switches play to the other flank and they repeat the drill from that side. Ill see if i can find a vid of it.

There are a number of good pressing drills you can find online although not exactly sure what Tottenham do regarding this.
 

Gbspurs

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#5
Does anyone here to to the games early enough to be able to catch some footage of the warm up and drills spurs do before the game. I've had a little look on YouTube and found a couple. What it is, I'm going back into football and I've been offered a coaching position at a club that I used to play with. I'm looking to get some new ideas whilst taking some ideas of my own to teach the kids. I've got a training session tomorrow with them and I've been told I'm more than welcome to take a few drills. I've got enough in my head from years of playing 20 odd years ago. Obviously I know they won't be able to do everything but looking to get maybe a bit that I could use at a later date. Also and advise from current coaches is more than welcome. Cheers guy
I can't remember it all but they do 20 yard sprints and also a routine of attack vs defence based around wing play.
They used to do an excellent drill where they pass between full back and winger then a midfield player sends one down the line and the winger crosses into the box and a group of attackers and defenders and they compete to score / defend. The ball is then fed back to the winger who switches play to the other flank and they repeat the drill from that side. Ill see if i can find a vid of it.

There are a number of good pressing drills you can find online although not exactly sure what Tottenham do regarding this.
They still do that one, its a good one.
 

fuzzylogic

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Thread starter #6
How old are the kids?

Make the drills match-related
Kid's I would say they are about 10, I'm kinda doing it between my job at work so I'm going to be a kinda floating coach who helps out where needed and when I can. The club are putting me through badges but I'm not doing any of it for any other reason than to help the kids and pass on some things I learned when I was signed full time to a professional club.
 

Jody

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#7
They used to do an excellent drill where they pass between full back and winger then a midfield player sends one down the line and the winger crosses into the box and a group of attackers and defenders and they compete to score / defend. The ball is then fed back to the winger who switches play to the other flank and they repeat the drill from that side. Ill see if i can find a vid of it.

There are a number of good pressing drills you can find online although not exactly sure what Tottenham do regarding this.
Yep this. Followed by watching all your favourite players hitting the ball wide / over the bar and then them all doing the funny running into the circle thingy.
 

Nocando

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#8
I can't remember it all but they do 20 yard sprints and also a routine of attack vs defence based around wing play.


They still do that one, its a good one.
Yeah its good as it keeps everyone involved and works on every aspect they need to consider in a match situation; communication, fitness, touch, vision, crossing, shape, positioning, timing, runs etc etc. The defence needs to be in a relatively high up starting position to reflect the nature of quick transition wing play.

Sorry I couldn't find a video of it.
 

aliyid

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3,551
#11
They used to do an excellent drill where they pass between full back and winger then a midfield player sends one down the line and the winger crosses into the box and a group of attackers and defenders and they compete to score / defend. The ball is then fed back to the winger who switches play to the other flank and they repeat the drill from that side. Ill see if i can find a vid of it.
Yep still do this drill before every game.

May get a vid before the Utd game and upload it if I’m in the ground early enough
 

slartibartfast

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#12
Kid's I would say they are about 10, I'm kinda doing it between my job at work so I'm going to be a kinda floating coach who helps out where needed and when I can. The club are putting me through badges but I'm not doing any of it for any other reason than to help the kids and pass on some things I learned when I was signed full time to a professional club.
You're gonna have to do your FA Level 1 coaching badge if you wanna coach kids and you'll be given loads of different drills (just dont call them drills lol) when you do that.
Edit, sorry never read your post properly but yeah, youll be given a book full of different exercises/games and videos. Good fun.
 
Last edited:

Waxman

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Nov 14, 2003
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#14
I've done my coaching badges and they do not issue you with a book of exercises or videos...

I also coach an academy team of U10s. So I know that the warm up routine that the Spurs senior team does before a match is way too complicated for a bunch of 10 year kids! Sorry

There's literally hundreds of different warm up exercises you can create and they simply need to do the following:

  • Be easy to explain - if you're talking for more than 20-30 seconds, then it's not going to work

  • Be fun

  • Be match related - no point have them line up to take shots or jog around the perimeter of the pitch. It must replicate some aspects of a real match

  • Be safe

  • Be buildable - so create a simple exercise that can develop gradually into an actual game. For example, playing tag is match related as it gets the kids to think about movement, space and has them sprinting and turning. You can then easily introduce the concept of passing if you make the 'tag' grabbing a football bib or allowing the kids to pass it on. Next you can give them a ball which they throw to a team mate to avoid being tagged and then finally you put the ball on the floor and make them use their feet.

  • Be related to one or all of the three phases of football - defending, attacking and transition.
(Important that the defenders become the attackers as opposed to having the defenders give the ball back to the attackers if they win it).

  • Be able to help the kids develop their technical and tactical skills; their physical capabilities; their social abilities; and their psychological side too. Don't underestimate the importance of all four corners...a skilful kid with no stamina or team ethic will not develop, likewise a training routine that gives the kids no 'success' (i.e. if scoring is the aim of your warm up then they have to sometimes score), will not develop a psychologically robust player...

ONE EXAMPLE
If you've got more than 8 kids to coach, have two balls and put four kids each in a marked out area - large enough for middle distance passing. Have some space between the two areas, and then number the kids 1-4 (or more if you have more than 8 kids!). Start them off passing to each other and encourage them to try skills and not just one touch passes, can they carry the ball etc. Then tell the kids who are number 1 (there should be one in each area), to go and get the ball from the other area. This creates 3v1 and you'd be surprised how easy it is at first for the one to come away with the ball.
 

FITZ

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May 17, 2004
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1,792
#15
I've done my coaching badges and they do not issue you with a book of exercises or videos...

I also coach an academy team of U10s. So I know that the warm up routine that the Spurs senior team does before a match is way too complicated for a bunch of 10 year kids! Sorry

There's literally hundreds of different warm up exercises you can create and they simply need to do the following:

  • Be easy to explain - if you're talking for more than 20-30 seconds, then it's not going to work

  • Be fun

  • Be match related - no point have them line up to take shots or jog around the perimeter of the pitch. It must replicate some aspects of a real match

  • Be safe

  • Be buildable - so create a simple exercise that can develop gradually into an actual game. For example, playing tag is match related as it gets the kids to think about movement, space and has them sprinting and turning. You can then easily introduce the concept of passing if you make the 'tag' grabbing a football bib or allowing the kids to pass it on. Next you can give them a ball which they throw to a team mate to avoid being tagged and then finally you put the ball on the floor and make them use their feet.

  • Be related to one or all of the three phases of football - defending, attacking and transition.
(Important that the defenders become the attackers as opposed to having the defenders give the ball back to the attackers if they win it).

  • Be able to help the kids develop their technical and tactical skills; their physical capabilities; their social abilities; and their psychological side too. Don't underestimate the importance of all four corners...a skilful kid with no stamina or team ethic will not develop, likewise a training routine that gives the kids no 'success' (i.e. if scoring is the aim of your warm up then they have to sometimes score), will not develop a psychologically robust player...

ONE EXAMPLE
If you've got more than 8 kids to coach, have two balls and put four kids each in a marked out area - large enough for middle distance passing. Have some space between the two areas, and then number the kids 1-4 (or more if you have more than 8 kids!). Start them off passing to each other and encourage them to try skills and not just one touch passes, can they carry the ball etc. Then tell the kids who are number 1 (there should be one in each area), to go and get the ball from the other area. This creates 3v1 and you'd be surprised how easy it is at first for the one to come away with the ball.
Really?

On my level one and two they gave me a book that had them in. It was an A5 book that had a whole range of other stuff as well. Not that it was overall useful but it was a starting point. Plus as you learnt all the different warm up methods for various ages you could note them all down.

There was also a DVD - but to be honest - at the time I didn’t have a DVD player or laptop that could play it.

There’s loads of paid and free websites online for coaching plans as well.

However if you do enjoy coaching the Youth Modules are better after you do your level 1 etc...
 

fuzzylogic

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Joined
Aug 2, 2004
Messages
1,117
Thread starter #16
I've done my coaching badges and they do not issue you with a book of exercises or videos...

I also coach an academy team of U10s. So I know that the warm up routine that the Spurs senior team does before a match is way too complicated for a bunch of 10 year kids! Sorry

There's literally hundreds of different warm up exercises you can create and they simply need to do the following:

  • Be easy to explain - if you're talking for more than 20-30 seconds, then it's not going to work

  • Be fun

  • Be match related - no point have them line up to take shots or jog around the perimeter of the pitch. It must replicate some aspects of a real match

  • Be safe

  • Be buildable - so create a simple exercise that can develop gradually into an actual game. For example, playing tag is match related as it gets the kids to think about movement, space and has them sprinting and turning. You can then easily introduce the concept of passing if you make the 'tag' grabbing a football bib or allowing the kids to pass it on. Next you can give them a ball which they throw to a team mate to avoid being tagged and then finally you put the ball on the floor and make them use their feet.

  • Be related to one or all of the three phases of football - defending, attacking and transition.
(Important that the defenders become the attackers as opposed to having the defenders give the ball back to the attackers if they win it).

  • Be able to help the kids develop their technical and tactical skills; their physical capabilities; their social abilities; and their psychological side too. Don't underestimate the importance of all four corners...a skilful kid with no stamina or team ethic will not develop, likewise a training routine that gives the kids no 'success' (i.e. if scoring is the aim of your warm up then they have to sometimes score), will not develop a psychologically robust player...

ONE EXAMPLE
If you've got more than 8 kids to coach, have two balls and put four kids each in a marked out area - large enough for middle distance passing. Have some space between the two areas, and then number the kids 1-4 (or more if you have more than 8 kids!). Start them off passing to each other and encourage them to try skills and not just one touch passes, can they carry the ball etc. Then tell the kids who are number 1 (there should be one in each area), to go and get the ball from the other area. This creates 3v1 and you'd be surprised how easy it is at first for the one to come away with the ball.
Didn't think they would issue a coaching book for idiot's tbh. And I know the spurs one will be to much for young kids but as I said I wanted to see what they do to see if there's anything that can give me ideas or take out of it even the slightest thing and incorporate into on of my own ideas. Cheers for all the other stuff you have posted thou
 

cider spurs

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Jul 5, 2016
Messages
3,467
#18
Corners. Start with feckin corners. You nail the art of training 'how to take corners'...I think there could be a role somewhere higher up the food chain.

Just can't remember where. :confused:
 

slartibartfast

Grunge baby forever
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
7,633
#19
I've done my coaching badges and they do not issue you with a book of exercises or videos...

I also coach an academy team of U10s. So I know that the warm up routine that the Spurs senior team does before a match is way too complicated for a bunch of 10 year kids! Sorry

There's literally hundreds of different warm up exercises you can create and they simply need to do the following:

  • Be easy to explain - if you're talking for more than 20-30 seconds, then it's not going to work

  • Be fun

  • Be match related - no point have them line up to take shots or jog around the perimeter of the pitch. It must replicate some aspects of a real match

  • Be safe

  • Be buildable - so create a simple exercise that can develop gradually into an actual game. For example, playing tag is match related as it gets the kids to think about movement, space and has them sprinting and turning. You can then easily introduce the concept of passing if you make the 'tag' grabbing a football bib or allowing the kids to pass it on. Next you can give them a ball which they throw to a team mate to avoid being tagged and then finally you put the ball on the floor and make them use their feet.

  • Be related to one or all of the three phases of football - defending, attacking and transition.
(Important that the defenders become the attackers as opposed to having the defenders give the ball back to the attackers if they win it).

  • Be able to help the kids develop their technical and tactical skills; their physical capabilities; their social abilities; and their psychological side too. Don't underestimate the importance of all four corners...a skilful kid with no stamina or team ethic will not develop, likewise a training routine that gives the kids no 'success' (i.e. if scoring is the aim of your warm up then they have to sometimes score), will not develop a psychologically robust player...

ONE EXAMPLE
If you've got more than 8 kids to coach, have two balls and put four kids each in a marked out area - large enough for middle distance passing. Have some space between the two areas, and then number the kids 1-4 (or more if you have more than 8 kids!). Start them off passing to each other and encourage them to try skills and not just one touch passes, can they carry the ball etc. Then tell the kids who are number 1 (there should be one in each area), to go and get the ball from the other area. This creates 3v1 and you'd be surprised how easy it is at first for the one to come away with the ball.
Strange as I and everyone on the course and at my club has one and videos.
What county fa did you do yours with and when if you dont mind me asking mate? Poor if you didnt.
Agree some (in the book) are too complicated for certain age groups. Even us adults struggled on the course lol.
 

slartibartfast

Grunge baby forever
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
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#20
Didn't think they would issue a coaching book for idiot's tbh. And I know the spurs one will be to much for young kids but as I said I wanted to see what they do to see if there's anything that can give me ideas or take out of it even the slightest thing and incorporate into on of my own ideas. Cheers for all the other stuff you have posted thou
That kind of thinking has changed to be honest and why ask if you already know everything? You already asked for training tips Spurs do to apply to 10 year olds!!!.
Everybody thinks they are a good coach. Obviously they are not.
The fa want focus on enjoyment and skill development not just setting up to win every game as we have done for decades to our detriment. Getting big lumps and hoofing long ball has gone.
There is no competetive league for mini soccer, no offside until u11. Team, ball and goal size all increase with age. Development is the key word and the fa want everyone across the country singing from the same hyme sheet which is why they make everyone take the Level 1.
Good luck mate but you're going to find things have changed drastically from when you played.
And heres photos of info you SHOULD get on your Level 1.
20190110_074349.jpg
20190110_074413.jpg
 
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